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A Guide to Performing Arts Resources

Research help for drama and dance.

Plagiarism

This guide is designed to help you find information on how to cite your sources correctly and to avoid plagiarism.

Plagiarism is taking someone else's ideas, words, images, or other types of work and presenting it as your own. Plagiarism can be avoided by adhereing to some basic guidelines:

The primary reasons for citing the sources used in your research papers, projects and presentations is to give credit to the authors of the works that you used to support your work, and to provide readers with the information they need to locate these sources themselves.. Accurately citing your sources leaves a research trail that allows others to locate the materials that you used.

Undergraduate Student Academic Integrity Policy

Chicago

The Chicago Manual of Style actually presents two different styles of documentation and citation: the humanities style, which uses notes and a bibliography, and the author-date system. As the name suggests, humanities style is more common for writing in the arts, literature, and related disciplines, while author-date is found more frequently, though not exclusively, in the natural and social sciences. "Turabian" is a version of the humanities style intended for student papers found in Kate Turabian's A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertions.

MLA (Modern Language Association) Style

Developed by the Modern Language Association, this style is widely used in literary studies and throughout the humanities. Unlike Chicago humanities style, it uses in-text citations rather than notes.