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Identifying Damaged Materials to Send to Preservation

This guide should assist staff and student assistants in identifying circulating and other material that needs repair or rebinding.

Book Problems

Most materials sent to the Preservation Unit from Circulation, Shelving, and Interlibrary Loan should be use driven. Staff and students who are checking-in materials that have circulated should be on the lookout for various kinds of damage.

This guide shows pictures of the kinds of damage that require a book to be sent to the Preservation Unit for repair, rebinding, replacement, or relabeling. Use driven means materials that are checked-in after they have circulated, or left on tables, study carrels, and othe places after users have finished using them within the libraries.

In addition, there are materials that are new to the collection that have problems  -- such as new books not in suitable physical condition to go directly to the libraries' shelves, as well as older books from purchase, backlogs, and donations that need some help.

Finally, there are books identified at the shelf that need repair or further treatment. In general, it is best to contact the Preservaton Unit first (935-4287) if sending more than just a few of materials identified at the shelf that are not in fact circulating.

Summary of Conditions

In general, these are the kinds of damage and situations that would require sending a book to the Preservation Unit. See the "parts of a book" tab in this guide for explanation of some of these terms.

  • Broken and compromised textblocks
  • Cracked spines
  • Damaged brittle books
  • Damaged call number labels
  • Damaged or warped covers
  • Empty or damaged boxes
  • Headcap damage
  • Hinge problems (loose, detached, torn)
  • Insect infestation
  • Loose endsheets
  • Mold
  • Pages missing, torn, cockled, loose
  • Pet damage
  • Paperbacks worn & torn, or curling covers
  • Red rot (if circulating)
  • Spine damage
  • Stiffened books worn & torn
  • Tape (home repair)
  • Uncut pages
  • Water damage

Book Problems